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9 months Ago

A tuple-inference bug in the Swift 3.0.1 compiler

Published by Marco on

I encountered some curious behavior while writing a service-locator interface (_protocol_) in Swift. I’ve reproduced the issue in a stripped-down playground[1] and am almost certain I’ve found a bug in the Swift 3.0.1 compiler included in XCode 8.2.1.

A Simple, Generic Function

We’ll start off with a very basic example, shown below.

 Simple argument with label

The example above shows a very simple function, generic in its single parameter with a required argument label a:. As expected, the compiler determines the... [More]

11 months Ago

Two more presentations: Web tools & Quino upgrade

Published by Marco on

Check out two new talks on our web site:

Networking Event: How Encodo builds web applications
At our last networking event, Urs presented our latest tech stack. We’ve been working productively with this stack for most of this year and feel we’ve finally stabilized on something we can use for a while. Urs discusses the technologies and libraries (TypeScript, Less, React, MobX) as well as tools (Visual Studio Code, WebStorm).
Quino: from 1.13 to 4.x
Since Quino 1.13 came out in December of... [More]

1 year Ago

Thoughts on .NET Standard 2.0

Published by Marco on

Check out two new talks on our web site:

Microsoft recently published a long blog article Introducing .NET Standard. The author Immo Landwerth appeared on a weekly videocast called The week in .NET to discuss and elaborate. I distilled all of this information into a presentation for Encodo’s programmers and published it to our web site, TechTalk: .NET Standard 2.0. I hope it helps!

Also, Sebastian has taken a Tech Talk... [More]

Tabs vs. Spaces … and how many?

Published by Marco on

Encodo has long been a two-space indent shop. Section 4.1 of the Encodo C# Handbook writes that “[a]n indent is two spaces; it is never a tab.”, even though “[t]he official C# standard […] is four spaces.” and that, should you have a problem with that, you should “deal with it.”

Although we use our own standards by default, we use a customer’s standards if they’ve defined their own. A large part of our coding is now done with four spaces. Some of us have gotten so accustomed to this that four... [More]

ABD: Improving the Aspect-modeling API for Quino

Published by Marco on

Overview

We discussed ABD in a recent article ABD: Refactoring and refining an API. To cite from that article,

“[…] the most important part of code is to think about how you’re writing it and what you’re building. You shouldn’t write a single line without thinking of the myriad ways in which it must fit into existing code and the established patterns and practices.”

With that in mind, I saw another teaching opportunity this week and wrote up my experience designing an improvement to an... [More]

ABD: Refactoring and refining an API

Published by Marco on

We’ve been doing more internal training lately and one topic that we’ve started to tackle is design for architecture/APIs. Even if you’re not officially a software architect—designing and building entire systems from scratch—every developer designs code, on some level.

[A]lways
[B]e
[D]esigning

There are broad guidelines about how to format and style code, about how many lines to put in a method, about how many parameters to use, and so on. We strive for Clean Code™.

But the most... [More]

2 years Ago

Networking Event 2016.1

Published by Marco on

 On Wednesday, Encodo had its first networking event of the year. Our very own Sebastian Greulach presented Code Review Best Practices. A bunch of our friends and colleagues from the area showed up for a lively discussion that, together with the presentation, lasted over 90 minutes.

We heard from people working with remote teams—off- and near-shored—as well as people working locally in both small and large teams and for small to large companies. We discussed various review styles, from... [More]

Voxxed Zürich 2016: Notes

Published by Marco on

This first-ever Voxxed Zürich was hosted at the cinema in the SihlCity shopping center in Zürich on March 3rd. All presentations were in English. The conference was relatively small—333 participants—and largely vendor-free. The overal technical level of the presentations and participants was quite high. I had a really nice time and enjoyed a lot of the presentations.

There was a nice common thread running through all of the presentations, starting with the Keynote. There’s a focus on... [More]

Finovate 2016: Bank2Things

Published by Marco on


At the beginning of the year, we worked on an interesting project that dipped into IOT (Internet of Things). The project was to create use cases for Crealogix’s banking APIs in the real world. Concretely, we wanted to show how a customer could use these APIs in their own workflows. The use cases were to provide proof of the promise of flexibility and integrability offered by well-designed APIs.

Watch 7–minute video of the presentation

The Use Cases

Football Club Treasurer

 Activity Stream in the AppThe first use... [More]

Git: Managing local commits and branches

Published by Marco on

At Encodo, we’ve got a relatively long history with Git. We’ve been using it exclusively for our internal source control since 2010.[1]

Git Workflows

 When we started with Git at Encodo, we were quite cautious. We didn’t change what had already worked for us with Perforce.[2] That is: all developers checked in to a central repository on a mainline or release branch. We usually worked with the mainline and never used personal or feature branches.

Realizing the limitation of this system, we next... [More]

Limited drive-space chronicles #2: Why...isual Studio installed on my machine?

Published by Marco on

If you’re like us at Encodo, you moved to SSDs years ago…and never looked back. However, SSDs are generally smaller because the price (still) ramps up quickly as you increase size. We’ve almost standardized on 512GB, but some of us still have 256GB drives.

Unfortunately, knowing that we all have giant hard drives started a trend among manufacturers to just install everything, just in case you might need it. This practice didn’t really cause problems when we were still using by-then... [More]

Improving NUnit integration with testing harnesses

Published by Marco on

 These days nobody who’s anybody in the software-development world is writing software without tests. Just writing them doesn’t help make the software better, though. You also need to be able to execute tests—reliably and quickly and repeatably.

That said, you’ll have to get yourself a test runner, which is a different tool from the compiler or the runtime. That is, just because your tests compile (satisfy all of the language rules) and could be executed doesn’t mean that you’re done writing... [More]

Encodo Git Handbook 3.0

Published by Marco on

Encodo first published a Git Handbook for employees in September 2011 and last updated it in July of 2012. Since then, we’ve continued to use Git, refining our practices and tools. Although a lot of the content is still relevant, some parts are quite outdated and the overall organization suffered through several subsequent, unpublished updates.

What did we change from the version 2.0?

  • We removed all references to the Encodo Git Shell. This shell was a custom environment based on Cygwin. It... [More]

3 years Ago

Question to consider when designing APIs: Part II

Published by Marco on

In the previous article, we listed a lot of questions that you should continuously ask yourself when you’re writing code. Even when you think you’re not designing anything, you’re actually making decisions that will affect either other team members or future versions of you.

In particular, we’d like to think about how we can reconcile a development process that involves asking so many questions and taking so many facets into consideration with YAGNI.

Designing != Implementing

The implication... [More]

4 years Ago

Questions to consider when designing APIs: Part I

Published by Marco on

A big part of an agile programmer’s job is API design. In an agile project, the architecture is defined from on high only in broad strokes, leaving the fine details of component design up to the implementer. Even in projects that are specified in much more detail, implementers will still find themselves in situations where they have to design something.

This means that programmers in an agile team have to be capable of weighing the pros and cons of various approaches in order to avoid causing... [More]